Securing the Association of the DTLS Certificate With the User’s SIP-URI

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imagesThe SIP protocol can be used to establish SRTP security using DTLS protocol. The DTLS extension ([RFC 5764]) is used. It describes a mechanism to transport a fingerprint attribute in SDP. So the fingerprint of the self-signed certificate can be inserted by the user agent (UA) in the SDP and sent over SIP to the proxy over an integrity protected channel (carried over TLS transport protocol). The fingerprint in the SDP looks like this:

a=fingerprint:sha-1 99:41:49:83:4a:97:0e:1f:ef:6d:f7:c9:c7:70:9d:1f:66:79:a8:07

Then after the user has been authenticated, the proxy generates a hash where the certificate’s fingerprint and SIP user ID are among others included in the calculation. The proxy signs the hash using its private key and inserts the signature in a new header field in the SIP message (the Identity header field). This secure the association between the DTLS certificate and the user’s SIP URI. The Identity-Info header field helps the verifier (the receiver of the SIP/SDP message) in the verification of the signature included in the Identity header field.

The certificates are being used as a carriers for the public keys and used to authenticate the counterpart and negotiate the session keys (symmetric keys). Then the session keys are used by SRTP to encrypt/decrypt the media. The offerer sends its fingerprint in the request and the answerer sends its fingerprint in the corresponding response after accepting the offer.

Using SIP Identity and Identity-Info

The solution as i mentioned above is using the SIP Identity ([RFC 4474]) to sign the binding of the fingerprint to the user. This is done by the proxy responsible for that user. The proxy is the holder of the private key of its domain. After the user is successfully authenticated, it is authorized to claim the identity (AOR of the user). The proxy creates the signature of the hash using its private key and inserts it in Identity header field. The proxy also inserts the place where the verifier can acquire the proxy’s certificate (public key) using the Identity-Info header field.

Example:

Identity: CyI4+nAkHrH3ntmaxgr01TMxTmtjP7MASwliNRdupRI1vpkXRvZXx1ja9k
3W+v1PDsy32MaqZi0M5WfEkXxbgTnPYW0jIoK8HMyY1VT7egt0kk4XrKFC
HYWGCl0nB2sNsM9CG4hq+YJZTMaSROoMUBhikVIjnQ8ykeD6UXNOyfI=
Identity-Info: https://example.com/cert

Note the part “/cert” in the Identity-Info URL which addresses a certificate.

The Hash Generation

The signature of the hash is added as an Identity header field in the SIP message. The calculation of the hash must contain mainly the AOR of the user and the fingerprint included in the SDP in the body of the message.  According to RFC [4474], the signature/hash is generated from certain components of SIP message, among others:

  • The AoR of the UA sending the message (or addr-spec of the From header field)
  •  The addr-spec component of the Contact header field value.
  • The whole SDP body (the fingerprint is here)
  • …….

Fingerprint Verification

Using the header Identity-Info, the user agent verifies that the fingerprint of the certificate received over the DTLS handshake matches the fingerprint received in the SDP of SIP request/response.


 References


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TURN In Few Words

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TURN is abbreviation for Traversal Using Relays around NAT. It is a control protocol that allows the host behind a NAT to exchange packets with its peers using the relay.  It is specified in the RFC [5766]. The following are few words about this protocol:

  • TURN is part of the ICE (Interactive Connectivity Establishment) but it can be used without ICE.
  • TURN is designed to solve the communication problem when both the client and its peer are behind respective NAT where the hole punching techniques (discovering direct communication path) may fail. In other words TURN is used when a direct communication path between the client and the pair can NOT be found.
  • The public TURN server sits between the two hosts that are behind NAT and relays the packets between them.
  • TURN is client-server protocol. The client is called TURN client and the server is called TURN server.
  • The TURN client obtains (using the TURN protocol -Allocate transaction) on the TURN server what is called relayed transport address (IP address and port).
  • The client sends CreatePermissions request to the TURN server to create permissions (permissions to validate the peer-server communication).
  • The TURN server sees the messages coming from the client as it is coming from a transport address on NAT. This address is called client’s server-reflexive transport address.
  • The NAT forwards packets coming to the client’s server-reflexive transport to the client’s host transport address (private address).
  • The TURN server receives the application data from the client, make the relayed transport address as the source of the packets and relays them to the peer using UDP datagrams.
  • The peer sends the application data in UDP packets to the client’s relayed transport address on the relay server. Then the server checks the permissions and on validation it relays the data to the client.
  • A way to communicate the relayed transport address and peers addresses (server-reflexive transport addresses) is needed (out of scope of the TURN protocol).

TURN

  • In VOIP, if TURN is used with ICE, then the client puts its obtained relayed transport address as an ICE candidate (among other candidates) in the SDP carried by the rendezvous protocol like SIP. When the other peers receives the SIP request, they will know how to reach the client.
  • The TURN messages (encapsulation of the application data) contains an indication of the peer the client is communicating with so the client can use a single relayed transport address to communicate with multiple peers. This is when the the rendezvous protocol (e.g. SIP) supports forking.
  • Using TURN is expensive so when TURN is used with ICE, the ICE uses hole punching techniques first to discover the direct path. If the direct path is not found, then TURN is used.
  • Using TURN makes the communication no longer peer to peer communication.

More Information


 

Distributed Hash Table (DHT) In Structured Peer-to-Peer SIP Overlay

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peersDistributed Hash Table (DHT) is used in structured Peer-to-Peer overlay for resource location and discovery. In SIP world, the resource can be the contact list (physical addresses) associated with an AOR (SIP/SIPS URI that points to a user on domain -virtual address of the user). The mappings between the AORs and the contact lists will be distributed amongst the peers in the SIP overlay. In this way we get a distributed registrar functionality for SIP.

There should be an interface for the DHT so it can be used without caring about the implementation and it can easily integrate with the SIP server so the server can work in P2P mode. Basically the functions that need to be implemented are: Join (join the overlay), Leave (leave the overlay), Lookup (search for a resource using the AOR as a key), and Store (store the resource). For example the lookup function works as following:

  • Using the AOR as a key to find the appropriate node/peer. The hash value of the key is used to find the node/peer ID.
  • Then the selected node/peer will do normal hash table (HT) lookup to get the value/resource/contact-list

The mappings {AOR, Contact List} can be stored persistently on disks in a key-value databases like Berkeley DB.

The IETF standards body is working on P2P-SIP. There is a working group called p2psip where you can find the internet drafts (working documents) related to P2P-SIP. For example the RELOAD (RFC [6940]) is a signaling protocol for resource location and discovery. It specifies “chord-reload” as a mandatory DHT algorithm to be implemented. The purpose of this work is distributed SIP registrar. The RELOAD works with SIP to enable the distributed SIP solution. The RELOAD can be used by other protocols and not only SIP (e.g. A Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) usage for RELOAD: Internet Draft: draft-jimenez-p2psip-coap-reload-10).

But why P2P SIP mode. This is because in P2P:

  • There is no one point of failure.
  • Less cost: avoid having service provider (Paying) + delete nodes/peers on low demand.
  • Capacity: Adding new nodes/peers on high demand.

The peer to peer SIP overlay is very suitable to be built over Openstack cloud where the automated creation and deletion of nodes/peers is based on predefined policies. The peers are defined in an autoscaling group where they are scaled up and down based on the autoscaling policies. When a node is determined to leave the overlay based on the cloud policies, the node starts the leave process where the configuration is delivered to it from the cloud (DELETE lifecycle hook). The trigger to add (<=> join the overlay) or delete server (<=> leave the overlay) are controlled by the cloud orchestration service (the scaling policies). The policies itself are based on CPU utilization, Load,…etc.


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